The Dandelion Clock

 

This superb tale by Rebecca Bryn takes the reader beyond the Earl Haig Fund, and the sale of poppies and badges—it truly highlights some reasons for Remembrance.

ABF The Soldiers’ Charity is one of two good causes receiving the royalties from sales.

Story Description by Rebecca Bryn

Click graphic for details

The Dandelion Clock is a story of young lovers torn apart by war. While Bill fights in Gallipoli, Egypt, and Palestine and endures the hardships and tragedies of war with his beloved horse, Copper, Florrie fights her own war at home in England and dreams of marriage to Bill.

Florrie’s widowed father is an abusive and violent drunkard, and she is bringing up her six siblings as best she can with rationing, poverty, and the loss of her menfolk – a mirror of my grandmother’s young life.

In times of self-doubt, Florrie turns to her dandelion clocks, ‘He lives; he lives not – he loves me; he loves me not.’ Can Bill survive to keep his promise to Florrie to marry her, and can he bring his old warhorse home safe? Will Bill and Florrie’s love survive five years apart?

 

The Inspiration for this story, by Rebecca Bryn – the author

The Dandelion Clock was inspired by some old photos I found when moving house. My grandparents, Bill and Florrie were a huge influence on my young life and the photos brought back both happy and sad memories. Here was Grandad mounted on his beloved horse—a horse that took him to Egypt and Palestine during the First World War and carried him into battle. His love of horses was something I inherited and which dominated my life for many years, so it was natural, when I began to tell Bill’s story, that his horse would play as important a part as his sweetheart, Florrie.

Researching and writing The Dandelion Clock opened my eyes to the sacrifices my grandparents and those of their generation made. It opened my eyes to the suffering and the hardships endured by both man and horse in the scorching heat of a waterless desert, and the freezing snow of Gallipoli.

The author’s grandfather

“I marched with the Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars across the salt flat before Chocolate Hill with no cover and Turkish guns on the hills around them picking them off like shooting fish in a barrel. I watched men and horses die of heat exhaustion in the Sinai Desert and learnt to stab, twist, and pull a bayonet. I watched the light go out of the eyes of men I had no cause to hate for a war I didn’t understand, and I came home to a country I barely recognised with wounded men begging on the streets, poverty, and few jobs, and wondered what I’d fought for.”

War changes people, as it changed my grandfather. The effects are far-reaching, far beyond the 40,000,000 casualties, of whom 20,000,000 of these died, and 11,000,000 of the dead were civilians. That leaves some 9,000,000 military deaths – young men, some volunteers but mostly conscripted who downed tools and marched to war never to return. The Dandelion Clock seeks to honour the men and horses of the Great War and the women who waited at home ‘keeping the home fires burning’ through rationing, poverty, and loss of their menfolk.

Royalties go to two charities:

ABF The Soldiers Charity

I felt the need to honour the courage of the soldiers of The Great War in some more charitable way, so I asked around some ex-military friends and was recommended a charity that supports both serving and veteran soldiers and their families. Half the royalties from pre-orders and sales of The Dandelion Clock up to Remembrance Day Centenary on November 11th 2018 will be donated to ABF The Soldiers Charity, a charity that supports soldiers, military widows, and their families through their darkest times. Their youngest beneficiary is 2-years-old and their oldest 106-years-old. With so many wounded men, some suffering shellshock, and many bereaved families, this is a charity that would have been greatly appreciated in 1918.

A hand up, not a hand out – “In 1944, around 3 million British soldiers were at war, notably in France, Italy and Burma, but with the end in sight, the Army Board realised that the State would not be able to provide for all the needs of those who would soon return to civilian life. The Army Benevolent Fund came into being on 15th August 1944. The “Fund for the Soldier” is, as The Times said, “an object none can question” because the soldier is what it is all about. In its first year, the Charity was ‘pump-primed’ with the huge sum of £1.5m from the NAAFI’s profits, enabling the Charity to make much-needed grants. – ABF The Soldiers’ Charity has a well-established and substantial grants programme of support to charities and organisations that provide lifetime support to soldiers, veterans and their immediate families. We will normally fund up to 100 charities in a given year which deliver support on behalf of the Army and ourselves.”

Brooke

The other half of my royalties will go to Brooke. It wasn’t until I reached the part in my story where I sought a way to bring Bill’s horse, Copper home, that I discovered the horrific end many of the faithful and courageous warhorses suffered. The Brooke is a charity that now rescues horses, mules, and donkeys in some of the poorest parts of the world.

Every horse remembered – “On arrival in Egypt in 1930, Dorothy Brooke was determined to find the surviving ex-warhorses of the British, Australian and American forces. These brave and noble horses were sold into a life of hard labour in Cairo when the conflict ended.

Searching for them throughout Cairo, Dorothy was appalled to find hundreds of emaciated and worn-out animals desperately in need of help. She wrote a letter to the Morning Post (which later became the Daily Telegraph) exposing their plight.

The public were so moved they sent her the equivalent of £20,000 in today’s money to help end the suffering of these once proud horses.

Within three years, Dorothy Brooke had purchased five thousand ex-warhorses. Most were old, exhausted and had to be humanely put down. But thanks to her compassion, they ended their lives peacefully.

Dorothy Brooke knew thousands of hard-working horses, donkeys and mules still suffered so in 1934 she founded the Old War Horse Memorial Hospital in Cairo, with the promise of free veterinary care for all the city’s working horses and donkeys. The Brooke Hospital for Animals was born.”

I also donate money to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum each year from sales of Touching the Wire – a story of the women of Auschwitz – to honour the victims and survivors of the Holocaust. Go to https://www.ushmm.org to help further Holocaust education.

It feels wrong to make money from the suffering of others, but in relating their stories, I hope to keep their memories alive, and donating is one way I can give something back to charities that would have been close to their hearts.

About the Author

 

Originally from Kettering, in Northamptonshire, Rebecca Bryn lives in West Wales with her husband and dog where she paints the fabulous coastal scenery and writes historical, mystery, and post-apocalyptic tales with a twist. She believes you shouldn’t judge a man until you’ve walked two moons in his moccasins and to date has a 100% success rate at surviving. :

 

 

My personal view of the story

Try if you will, to go without food for a day, or a decent hot drink, or sleep … having worn the same clothes for days on end in a range of temperatures. What could be worse? Place yourself in adverse conditions and introduce a few ground-shaking bombs and an enemy firing at you.

Have you considered the ability to clean and service your rifle and equipment?

How about aiming and firing back at the enemy from a water-filled, muddy trench.

Combine these things with the remorseless ‘duty-bound’ attitude of your leadership—now you have a tiny vision of life in The Great War.

Be rewarded for playing your part

If you’d like to help Rebecca support these charities and get a wonderful book to read, you can pre-order The Dandelion Clock. The eBook is currently available on pre-order at the special price of 99p/99c until September 4th. On release, September 5th it will be priced at £1.99/$2.99.

This book is also available in paperback.

Contact Rebecca Bryn:

Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/rebeccabryn

Bookbub page: – https://www.bookbub.com/authors/rebecca-bryn-5527e97a-146a-49e7-95c7-a30b0f603c80

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/authorshow/8434030.RebeccaBryn

Website: – https://rebeccabrynblog.wordpress.com/

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/rebeccabryn1

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/rebecca.bryn.novels

Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/jandrcoulson

Google +: https://plus.google.com/+RebeccaBryn

Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmjL99ImZV_TdNpDaOxiVOw

And : http://www.independentauthornetwork.com/rebecca-bryn

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Back to the Future

The graphic for this post is of an acrylic on canvas I completed last year.  It depicts myself and my wife sitting on a hill overlooking Derwent Water in the Lake District.  I used a photo taken by our son as the basis for the painting.  Apart from being a fellow artist I think he’s pretty handy with a camera and has an appreciation of good photo composition … but then I’m biased.

Since my last entry here I’ve allowed ‘life’ to infiltrate my writing world.  A home improvement project which had to be done in logical sessions took up a lot of time, but the finished result is like looking at a good piece of writing.  It would be selfish of me to concentrate only on my writing so I don’t mind the occasional sacrifice of some time.

Making matters worse for my time at the keyboard, work took it’s toll because it’s the busiest time of the year for stationery retailers, so I was left feeling too tired to write anything worthwhile.  It was a couple of days before I realised I wasn’t writing on my train journeys – preferring to concentrate on staying awake.  It’s over a year now since I last dozed off on the journey home, thus adding another ninety minutes to my trip.

So here I am, back at the helm, controls, bridge or whatever is the best analogy.  On the odd occasion when I have been relaxing I’ve managed to upload some poetry, a short story and a variety of my artwork to the ‘Apollo Blessed’ site.  Like all good sites they appear to be a nice bunch of creatives.  I do like the idea of stories, poetry, art, photography and music all being treated as ‘art’, rather than a single strand of work being concentrated there.  Like myself there are several folk who like to express themselves with more than just words.

I feel better now that I’ve managed to put another entry together, so now with the redecorated kitchen and dining room organised I feel free to get back into the saddle, relax and write.  Two short stories for competitions, my novel and untold ideas for poems await my attention … and I can feel a drawing coming into focus …