Seeing the Light

Light at The End, as I’ve said before,  was an experiment. If it had been ridiculed by my beta readers I’d have shelved or abandoned writing a post-apocalyptic story. It’s also important to me that I enjoy telling the story because in my opinion, an author can generate   enthusiasm in the telling.

I wrote a post some time ago regarding my first attempt at a trilogy and I’ll quote a snippet:

‘Originality is relatively easy when an author is working on a single title. When the title/premise goes to a second, third or more, the idea must be examined closely to see how far it can be taken without repetition.

Certain sub-genres can run for several books and if the author is careful and inventive the fictional world will remain exciting to the reader. This must be paramount in the mindset of the creator of the work. Reader satisfaction is everything.’

Now, here I am on that same road once again. I am close to completion of Light to Dark which will be the sequel to Light at The End. A few days ago while out walking in local woodland I was struck by inspiration, and no, it didn’t hurt. When I got home I made notes for the final chapter if the story were a trilogy.

No, you didn’t read that wrong. I was thinking about how to end Book 2 and I imagined how things could go after that point … and so was born the early ideas for Dark to Light … Book 3 in the Light at The End trilogy.

I aim to have Book 2 ready for beta readers in August.

For me, from the outset, the tale has been a departure from most other stories I’ve written but the genre offers so many possibilities. I’ve been finding that however things might be going for the characters there must be a sense of hope … that things can’t just end because of the ill-considered actions of a few.

After all, don’t we all need to believe that there is to be a tomorrow?

I was wrong. Apologies to youth.

A few words from somebody who can see beyond our ‘lockdown’.

Rebecca Bryn

I was just a twinkle in my father’s eye when this photograph was taken on June 8th 1945. My mother is the lady front right, and the little boy she has her hand on is my older brother, who’d have been about two at the time. The face behind the camera is almost certainly my father’s. He loved gadgets and was a keen photographer as my trip to the family photo box has just shown me.

The scene is Regent Street in Kettering, Northamptonshire, my grandparents’ home, where I was born and lived for the first year of my life. It’s a place that features in some of my novels, and I have happy memories of it – a secure, tranquil place where I knew I was loved.

But life in the years immediately before I was born were far from secure or tranquil, and it’s only by living through…

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Beyond the story

 

Inspiration comes to authors in many ways and from countless sources. It may be that phrase overheard while out shopping, how another driver has misbehaved, or a special location on holiday. For most people, a walk, run, cycle, drive or any other outing is simply a means of     getting from Point A to Point B.

To a writer, each trip holds golden opportunities.

I’ve written poetry and short stories which feature the Scottish Highlands and the region makes an appearance in several of my novels.     Indeed, most of my erotica series, Highland Games is based there in a remote glen.

Light at The End had been a story idea for a few months but I needed more than what I’d conjured up in my imagination. I didn’t want an entirely fictional tale, I wanted to include something   substantial from the real world … a piece of reality which could not be denied.

Perhaps it’s not so surprising that when I eventually went on a tour of Cruachan Hydro-Electric Power Station my imagination went into hyperdrive. The installation is   colloquially known as The Hollow Mountain because the   entire enterprise is inside a mountain. The only visual   indication that the place is established is the dam between two lochs.

I’d considered a story in which the ‘Hollow Mountain’ was a feature but my visit became absorbing research. I went on the tour inside the mountain which for me meant photographs, notes, sketches and a host of questions for three of the members of staff.

My new story, at last, had a foundation and my characters evolved. Over the past few months, it has become my top-selling title. It may not have many reviews but I blame that on rules regarding reviewer eligibility.

From the feedback I’ve had in comments, emails and the handful of reviews the book has received, I’ve been emboldened to get working on a sequel.

Light to Dark will take over where Light at The End left off and we shall see just how my survivors have fared in their brave new world;      inside a mountain.

 

Unlike the first book, the research for the sequel has been conducted over many years. I’ve walked, climbed, canoed, abseiled, camped and enjoyed being reminded of man’s insignificance amidst mountains, rivers and forests which existed before us and will outlive us.

 

My aim is to show how the apocalypse survivors sense the need to move forward and the difficulties they encounter on their new adventures to save mankind from extinction.

***

Free to Choose

Let’s be honest from the outset, few folks are going to spend their cash if they can get something free of charge.

In the world of eBooks there are many reasons for titles to be offered ‘Free’ which include:

–an author’s promotion.

–a website promotion.

— a story to attract interest in the author’s work.

— pirate sources offering authors’ work free illegally.

How about paying a reduced price instead of aiming straight for the freebie?

 

 

 

 

Again, we have a number of reasons but now we’re being asked to pay so why would we choose to do such a thing?

Instead of making a list, there is one main aspect I’d highlight. The author or the supplier is content that the product is worthy of being sold but for whatever reason, the price has been reduced. The onus is on the buying public to look at the reduction which is invariably explained to us in a brief message or if you prefer ‘sales pitch’.

Personally, I’m sceptical when it comes to getting something for ‘free’, but I’m always happy to pay if I perceive a bargain. For example, if there were an eBook that caught my eye and I was getting it for a reduced price I’d buy it, especially if it were by an author I’d yet to try.

In this present climate of international lock-down, we have many thousands of people who are reading more or possibly reading for the first time in many years. Money is a concern, of course, so once again we’re back to that question of taking what’s free or pay, but not too much.

It was with this theory in mind that I created the eBook Bank International a few weeks ago. eBooks for 99p  (or equivalent).

No, it’s not a promotional website for authors in the conventional sense, it is a place which has in excess of 120 titles covering a wide range of genres and includes 17 authors’ work. This is a site which promotes authors, eBooks and the idea that just for once somebody cares about how much money people can afford to spend.

Why is the website based on ‘selling’ for 99p (or equivalent) instead of just giving away our books?

Imagine the number of people out there with an eReader who grab anything for free. Many of them will download titles they’ll never read but they got them for free–their only reason to take the book.

Now, imagine the number of people who might be prepared to pay but only a small amount … say, 99p for an eBook which is normally £2.49. Each title purchased is an investment by that reader and they will likely go on to read the book.

What do the authors get from reducing their prices but not making the titles free?

Interest in their hard work is the first thing, and then, of course, a few sales due to the lower price. The authors involved in this venture may give up a small amount in the first place but they’ve made an investment–in readership. Perhaps their £2.49 title was competitive but the price still put people off and then that same book was offered at 99p … a win-win situation.

Again, on a personal note, I’d rather see a title sell fifty times at 99p than twice at £2.49.

In this post, I’ve featured a variety of my titles but there are many other authors involved in the eBook Bank project, so why not pay a visit and pick up a bargain for 99p (or equivalent).

***

Beta or Worse?

Okay, so you’ve written a book and you’ve got a cover.

When you’re happy, do you go ahead and publish, or do you take it steady and make sure it’s readable?

Personally, I ask for beta readers and the more the merrier, whether it be a novel or a         collection of short stories. Yes, there might be a few issues in the final product but they also appear in books by acclaimed traditionally-published authors. Errors can be cut down dramatically with some effort and patience. It’s the responsibility of the author to produce the best book they can.

Before I send a manuscript to readers I’ll have gone at least as far as the third draft and on at least two occasions printed the story to perform a ‘red-pen’ edit. Even then, I tend to offer my beta readers a handful of things I’m    concerned about—a reader’s guide if you like:

Does the intro work? Is the dialogue realistic? Are the characters believable? Did you enjoy the story?

The list can be as long as the author feels necessary, but it’s hoped that the beta reader will highlight other issues too. If you create your characters and your imaginary world with care and attention to detail it will help to make the end product believable.

I’ve performed beta reading for many indie authors. Each book is different in length, style, author’s voice and topic. Not every book might be one I’d go looking for as reading material, but if it will help a fellow author I’m glad to do what I can if I can afford the time.

No, I’m not an editor but my expertise is that of the   reader who knows when something isn’t right in a variety of areas.

I know for example that firing an automatic pistol at a padlock or a door lock is about as much good as throwing your pen at it. Similarly, the only time firing a handgun at an escaping car will work is in movie-land. I know when to use farther instead of further, and inquiry rather than enquiry. No, a cowboy wasn’t thrown against the barn door by the ‘blast’ from a Colt 45, and I don’t care how close his adversary might have been. They’d need to be close just to hit one another. Cars don’t explode simply because they’ve overturned, and some blades don’t slide straight back out of the body after being thrust inward and upward.

Consistency and continuity are important to me and they are not the same thing.

Regarding consistency, I’m looking for a character’s name to always have one spelling, unless a nickname is used, and if a character has blue eyes, then they shouldn’t have brown eyes in the next chapter.

In continuity, I expect that when a character gets into a blue Jaguar and drives somewhere, they don’t get out of a red BMW at their destination.

To avoid rereading I prefer that no two characters use the same weapon, drive the same car or have similar names.

Two characters should not have their voices heard in the same paragraph but it seems to happen in a lot of eBooks. Sentences should also be manageable so that by the time you reach the end you remember the subject.

Dialogue tags don’t always have to be descriptive because the imagery and the dialogue ought to be creating the picture.

It’s fine, even preferable for a character to have a favourite word or phrase but not an author. Think about that one.

One of my greatest gripes is an author who doesn’t know their subject. Take for example the case of the famous   author who’s BDSM character introduces a young woman to mild punishment by giving her a traumatic thrashing with a leather belt, or … no, I’ll leave erotica out of this. Some misguided ideas would make your eyes water.

You get the idea … research, research, research, and don’t just use Google.

If you have space and are physically capable, get out of your chair and try the move you’ve just choreographed. How about:

Getting out of the car, she touched-up her lip gloss and lifted her purse.

No, she didn’t do it all while ‘getting out of the car’ she performed three separate actions.

Recently, I’ve spent a lot of time beta-reading for fellow indies and one of the things I feel that it does is help me in my writing. When I see an issue it tends to stand out and I learn from it, so it’s much less likely that I’ll do it in my work. Invariably, I gain confidence in my writing by seeing that in many cases I know when something is wrong or could be improved.

As an author, I’m aware of how important it is that I read regularly and widely. Thankfully because I’m a member of Kindle Unlimited I’ve been able to start and discard three books in the past couple of weeks. Unfortunate,   perhaps, but if those authors had taken the time to ask for a beta reader or two and I’d finished their books, I might have become a fan.

This article isn’t a rant, I’m highlighting an area of our craft that all indie authors should consider.

All comments are appreciated as always.

***

P.S. Yes, I have changed my blog theme again. 🙂

Time after Time – part 2

 

What’s with the ‘part 2’ in the title?

My first blog regarding this topic and the idea was Time after Time on 7th December 2019. I thought it would keep everything neat and tidy if I used the same blog title with the addition of ‘part 2’. It doesn’t mean it’s the second book. It’s not rocket science, and if it was, the theme of the stories would be Sci-Fi … but I digress.

Mainly because I have faith in the standard of the authors there, I only promoted my blog post to the Indie Author Support and Discussion (IASD) group on Facebook.

Apart from one author and friend outside of the group I had the promise of stories from three people. As might be expected, the cusp of a new year is not a great time to capture anybody’s attention so after the minimal interest in December 2019 and January 2020 it was time to play my ace … post again in February.

Inside forty-eight hours I acquired a handful of original/unpublished stories from proposed guest authors and the promise of tales from others.

How do things now stand?

I’m pleased to report that I have completed my personal contribution (six original stories). I may add more if my imagination and time permits.

I have five original stories from guests.

My estimate at this time is that the anthology will contain at least fifteen stories of between 1,000-4,000 words. When published the eBook will be available for 99p/99c and it will also, of course, be available Free on Kindle Unlimited, as are all of my titles.

Now that I have a reasonable number of guest authors and stories, it’s just a matter of time ….

The proposed publication is July 2020, but if sufficient work is done on all of the stories (including my own), and they are ready earlier I’ll be happy to publish earlier.

I had intended to add ‘bonus’ stories of previously published work by the authors but I’ve dropped the idea to avoid upsetting those readers who don’t like finding stories they’ve found elsewhere.

I’m sure any reader or writer would agree it will be a bargain and a great collection.

***

Light at The End

 

This is my first attempt at depicting a post-apocalyptic scenario. Almost every day in the media we learn of conflict in various regions around the globe … or ‘across the board’ for the Flat Earth Society. 😀

As ‘nations’ argue with each other publicly and their leaders make veiled threats via international media and occasionally on social media, many people cast it all aside as hot air. All around we hear cries of ‘We’ve heard it all before’, but what if on one fateful day it all goes wrong and some of the threats fall on the wrong ears?

The blurb follows below with the cover image. If you’d like to see how things get underway there is an Amazon link below. The first chapter is available under the book title in my Novels section of the main menu.

***

Bill Kane’s long military career had recently ended so he relaxed by joining a three-day sightseeing tour in the Scottish Highlands. At last, the ex-Serviceman would be able to leave stress and decision-making to somebody else, or would he?

While the squabbling of world leaders intensified on international media, Bill, like others, shrugged it off as sabre-rattling, but the sabres in question were nuclear missiles. An unthinkable situation developed rapidly. A missile was launched, and retaliation became a chain reaction.

On a mountain road in Scotland, Paul Harrington a young coach driver listened to the news in disbelief. When his passengers returned down the hill from the latest viewpoint it would be Paul’s responsibility to get them to safety, but to where?

No town was within easy reach, but he remembered a disused railway tunnel not far away. Could he get them there in time, and how would they survive?

***

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