Time after Time

 

When a writing idea comes to you is it best to shelve it in your memory, note it in your diary, or get it down where you can play around with it and see if it has any merit?

I’m a great believer in the writing it down method. Although I enjoy writing novels I am unashamedly addicted to the discipline of short story writing.

While working on a story for inclusion on Around the Bend: and other stories, my next anthology, I considered a tale which involved the passage of time, and it struck me that ‘Time’ would be a superb theme for a multi-author anthology. I could write my standard twelve tales to build a collection, but then I thought how great it would be for the reader to have different voices and styles.

Short story collections may not be at the top of readers’ shopping lists, but when there is the opportunity to read a selection of authors and obtain quality with quantity … it works for everybody concerned. I don’t go through the mill of trying to make my author compilations free on Amazon, and I don’t use Smashwords. I do, however, make the price the lowest possible and like all of my titles, I list the combined-effort anthologies on Kindle Unlimited.

Rather than detail everything twice, I have added the idea to my Work in Progress (WIP) list on the main menu. If you feel you could produce a short story based on the theme ‘Time’ and you’d like to donate a tale or two to the collection, please click Time after Time or the book cover graphic, and leave a suitable comment on the appropriate page.

If you’d like to just read the criteria and make a suggestion or comment, please do so.

As you’ll see from my WIP I have a lot on my schedule but I will be taking a keen interest in any stories which are offered for the multi-author collection. There are certain criteria as noted on the book’s page, but above all, I am aiming for quality stories.

I’ve already produced ‘My Writing Year – 2019’ back in November, so no doubt this post will be my final one for 2019.

Thank you to all who take the time to visit and special thanks to you lovely people who make the effort to leave a comment. I wish you all a great festive season and look forward with you to another great reading and writing year.

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Producing an Anthology

 

Have you ever considered producing an anthology of short stories?

Perhaps you’ve written short stories and never considered creating a collection, or you’re a novelist who shuns the short story discipline to concentrate on longer work.

My first anthology was a project, a challenge, a dream, and a nightmare all before it became a reality.

I’d written numerous short stories and won competitions, but Smoke & Mirrors: and other stories was my first foray into compiling an anthology. Should I aim for a theme or go multi-genre? Is it best to go with a complete set of original work or include something which has been commended? Go it alone or ask other people to donate a story?

The questions pile up about ten seconds after the decision to tackle such a project.

I’m pleased to report that stories from that first collection are still referred to in reviews, which is heartwarming. It is also a testament to the credibility of the stories and justifies their inclusion. I’ve now compiled seven anthologies including The Welcome: and other Sci-Fi stories created by inviting other authors to join me.

When I compiled ‘The Welcome’ it was never about earning money, it was always intended as a platform for fellow authors from the IASD and me to get examples of our work out there. No, the collection hasn’t made me a millionaire although the book continues to sell the occasional copy. Thanks to Amazon’s peculiar attitude to customers spending a set amount of money before being allowed to comment, there are now fewer reviews being posted.

I suppose I should come clean and admit that if you’re a multi-genre author like me there is a constant need to work on a new anthology. If writing short stories appeals to you then the next logical step must be producing a range of your work instead of keeping it aside waiting for the opportunity a competition offers.

Would you prefer to keep all the stories in one genre, or might you find it easier to mix the genre?

The two main routes to go are theme-based or genre-based, and then, of course, you can go it alone or invite work from others. Apart from anything else, it’s a great way to hone your writing skills.

I enjoy reading and writing short stories. In the Resources section of my blog, apart from tips on the discipline of Writing a Short Story and Competition Writing I have sections regarding anthologies, Creating an Anthology, and Theme or Genre-based?

The key, as with all writing projects is the desire to take on the mission.

If you are more inclined to work on novels, you’ll appreciate that your manuscript needs some downtime, and one of the most useful ways of dealing with this I’ve found is to work on a couple of short stories. Sometimes the distraction produces further inspiration for the novel.

Have you considered inviting fellow authors to join you in creating a collection?

If you have a favourite genre or theme you could create a collection of your short stories or use yours as a base and mix in stories donated by other authors. You are in control.

When you get right down to it, you are practising your writing craft by producing short stories so why not take that next step and build up a few and make them the ‘chapters’ of your first anthology.

I dare you—you’ll be hooked.

My next anthology, due publication in 2020, starts with a factual story, so once again, another twist. The aim for me is to produce a collection of twelve original tales supplemented by three ‘bonus’ stories which are selected from my other anthologies. This creates value for the reader and provides a platform for the other work by the author.

 

Thank you for dropping by, and, as always, comments are welcomed.

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